Emilio's Draft Registration Card 


In other words, close to 25% of the total population is represented in this record set. Young men were required to register for the draft regardless of their U.S. citizenship status, although aliens were not subject to enlistment. This means that a large portion of immigrant men registered and gave information of birth date, birthplace, and in most cases their father's birthplace and nearest relative.

...8th Street the address he listed for his father's on the ship manifest when he emigrated from Italy in 1913 (click here to see a map of the two locations ). 

According to Ancestry.com , in 1917 and 1918 approximately 24 million men living in the United States completed a selective service system registration card. This represented approximately 98% of men under the age of 46 covering a huge portion of the population of the U.S. at the time. Total U.S. population in 1917-1918 was about 100 million individuals. In other words, close to 25% of the total population is represented in this record set. Young men were required to register for the draft regardless of their U.S. citizenship status, although aliens were not subject to enlistment. This means that a large portion of immigrant men registered and gave information of birth date, birthplace, and in most cases their father's birthplace and nearest relative.

I recently found the World War I draft registration card for Emilio Vizzaccaro, dated 5 June 1917. The quality of this scan is low, and some of the data hard to read, but it adds a few interesting tidbits of knowledge.

First, it lists Emilio's residence as 820 S. Mildred in Philadelphia.   This is literally right around the corner from 900 S. 8th Street the address he listed for his father's on the ship manifest when he emigrated from Italy in 1913 (click here to see a map of the two locations ).   Depending on how the street numbering system works in Philadelphia, these addresses could potentially be on the same block.

Second, it confirms some information about his birth, principally the date (2 June 1894) and the location (Caira di Casino, Italy).   Caira is a small village just outside the town of Cassino (ocasionally spelled with one "s" but now usually with two), and is a frazione of the commune of Cassino.

Third, it describes his occupation as being a laborer for the Pennsylvanai Railroad Company.   This is something I had not known before, and is especially interesting.

Fourth, Emilio is single with his father listed as being "solely dependent" upon him for support.   This would imply that Emilio's father, Loreto, was no longer working.

Fifth, the physical description of Emilio is vague but consistent with other descriptions I've seen:   short, with medium build, brown hair and chestnut eyes.   No disabilities are noted.

Sixth, Emilio's surname is spelled two different ways on the card.   He registered as "Emilio Vizzaccaro" but signed the card "Emilio Vizzacehero".   It appears that had already begun to phoneticize the spelling of Vizzaccaro. 

Posted: Sun - August 8, 2004 at 03:41 PM          


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