O Brothers, Where Art Thou? 


I have found no evidence that Giuseppe stayed in the U.S. permanently, but recently I found evidence that he came through the port at Philadelphia in 1914 and he listed my great-grandfather, Loreto, as the person he was coming to join.

...As far as I know, Orazio stayed in the U.S. until his death: he and his family appear in the 1920 and 1930 census records (I haven't found him in 1910, though) and he is mentioned in 1947 letter to my grandfather Emilio from Emilio's brother Antonio.

Memories are a little sketchy, but my dad and some of his brothers remember driving down to Medford, NJ to visit with this family: an aunt Tressie (almost certainly Teresia, above) is remembered fondly, and I have a picture of someone I think is Ralph's wife, Mary, standing with my uncles Joe and Vince in their service uniforms. 

I have suspected for some time that my great-grandmother Maria Nardone had at least two brothers, Giuseppe Nardone and Orazio Nardone.

When my great-grandfather Loreto (Maria Nardone's husband) emigrated to the United States in 1910, he declared that we was going to join his brother-in-law Giuseppe Nardone in Philadelphia. I have found no evidence that Giuseppe stayed in the U.S. permanently, but recently I found evidence that he came through the port at Philadelphia in 1914 and he listed my great-grandfather, Loreto, as the person he was coming to join. So, sometime between 1910 and 1914 he must have returned to Italy. I presume this was to visit his wife, listed as Maria Giuseppa, and any children he may have had. Additionally, I found a manifest from 1920 showing that Giuseppe returned to the United States yet again, this time declaring that he was coming to join his brother "Rasio", or Orazio, in Philadelphia.

Moreover, in 1901 a Giuseppe Nardone of the right age (i.e. born in 1877) came through Ellis on his way to Philadelphia from Cassino. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to establish that this is the OUR Giuseppe: Cassino was decent size town in 1901 (population 13,397) and Giuseppe Nardone is not an uncommon name. The manifest listed no contact in Italy and listed only "brother Nardone" as the contact in the U.S. However, I know that Giuseppe was here in 1906: he was listed as the U.S. contact for his brother Orazio on Orazio's ship manifest.

I also recently found Giuseppe's birth record in the Cassino microfilms, which leads me to believe that he was alive in Italy as late as 1949. Remember that all of Cassino's vital records from 1861 on were destroyed by the Allied bombing of Montecassino during World War II. After the war, town officials recreated the records by having everyone vouch for their own birth and marriage dates. For Giuseppe (born in 1877) to appear in these records, he almost certainly would have had to been alive in 1949. Given that I have found no records of Giuseppe in America after 1920, this seems a reasonable assumption.

I briefly mentioned Orazio earlier, but in some ways he plays a bigger role in my family's story. When he came to America in 1906, he brought his family with him: wife Maddelena, son Raffaele, daughter Teresia, son Tommaso, and daughter Adelelaide. As far as I know, Orazio stayed in the U.S. until his death: he and his family appear in the 1920 and 1930 census records (I haven't found him in 1910, though) and he is mentioned in 1947 letter to my grandfather Emilio from Emilio's brother Antonio.

Memories are a little sketchy, but my dad and some of his brothers remember driving down to Medford, NJ to visit with this family: an aunt Tressie (almost certainly Teresia, above) is remembered fondly, and I have a picture of someone I think is Ralph's wife, Mary, standing with my uncles Joe and Vince in their service uniforms. Someone ran a restaurant, but dad isn't sure whom.

So, on my genealogical "to do" list are 1) figure out whether Giuseppe Nardone eventually settled in Italy or America; and 2) find some living descendants of Orazio Nardone. He had a large family, so chance are that with some luck I will be successful. I think my best chances are running down Ralph Nardone's descendants and those of Nazareno Sabatucci, who I think might have married the belove "aunt Tressie". 

Posted: Sun - June 5, 2005 at 04:33 PM          


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